Delving into the Intangibles


   Medicine  
     
  No other industry has made such rapid progress as medicine, including the technological development of medical devices. Also eating habits have improved, contributing to the increase in life expectancy from 50 years to almost 100 years.

The most revolutionary development in this march of history was the Streptomycin antibiotic, which was brought to Japan from the United States after the war. Tuberculosis, a once feared  "death disease," has been almost eradicated.

After the war, when we thought of medicine, we had in mind fairly basic pharmaceutical products that were tangible enough. For increased physical strength, liver oil extracted from the livers of such things as sharks; for wounds, “Mensoretams” and iodine tinctures; for diarrhea, “Seirogan” pills; for stomach upsets, sodium bicarbonate; for headaches, “Kerorin” headache powder containing aspirin, wrapped up bandages, medicine box left by itinerant merchant from Toyama ; etcetera. That is now a very nostalgic memory.

When I was in elementary school, I took vitamins from the dried and ground powder of locusts. Once a week, instead of homework, we went out to the fields and caught them. I used to ask the senior boys to put aside for me, “Well, about 10 insects, please.” Beriberi is known to result from a lack of vitamin B1, and its cure was worshiped as something having magical and intangible powers. When the green and yellow vegetable fad arrived, mothers unanimously said that vitamin A was essential for good health. At that time, the vitamins widely known extended only up to vitamin B, but today all sorts of vitamins can be taken in a single multivitamin tablet.

Because there are so many medicines for the human body, there is no reason to think medicines that will work on the invisible heart will not be developed. Cardiac hypertrophy is a nasty disease, sure enough, But hypertrophy of “Ego” is far more troublesome in this developed capitalist society as we can witness in G20, territorial dispute, economic friction, nuclear issue, plastic waste and such......all resulting from the “Ego” of humans in pursuit of  “comfort” and “convenient” life, much more and more, without limits of bounds.

Drugs to put a curb to desires, agents for anti-bullying or jealousy,.....aren’t there any such cure-all available at the pharmacy? Perhaps it goes like this at home, “Dad, have you taken a desire-killer?” or "Mama, please don't forget to take a jealousy -adjuster." and so on!

"Egotamine", "Jealousix", etc. ... A dream tablet for the world leaders also to take, No doubt peace will come to our workplace, home, and the whole world!

 
                                                        K.Yamakawa